Is Analytics Data Your Enemy Or Ally? : Tommie Powers Blog | Content & Display Network Expert Blog | Internet And Mobile Marketing Expert Blog

November 3, 2010

Is Analytics Data Your Enemy Or Ally?

November 3, 2010 by Tommie · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advertising Online, Advice, Site Analytics 

Well if you don’t know how to interpret your analytics data, it’s your worst enemy.

What the Gurus don’t tell you about traffic is how to interpret the massive amounts of data you should be collecting to help you convert that traffic.

Advantage: Guru

Now you’re left wondering:

“Why am I getting all this traffic and still not making any money?”

That’s when the Gurus are able to sell you some new bright shiny object that’s supposed to be the “magic bullet” solution.

The naked truth exposed:

It doesn’t take hordes of traffic to make a killing online.

All you need is a solid plan to get good quality traffic and the tools to determine how to turn that traffic into cash.

Not hard to accomplish.

Stay tuned for more on this matter soon.

I’m going to help you solve this piece of the puzzle.

If you are not on my email notifications list, you should fix that problem right now.

It’s easy, just send a blank email to list@tommiepowers.com and be
sure to check your email and confirm your request.

P.S. Leave comments below so I know what you will need me to help you with regarding this matter.

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4-Year-Old Can Be Sued, Judge Rules in Bike Case

October 29, 2010

The ruling by the judge, Justice Paul Wooten of State Supreme Court in Manhattan, did not find that the girl was liable, but merely permitted a lawsuit brought against her, another boy and their parents to move forward.

The suit that Justice Wooten allowed to proceed claims that in April 2009, Juliet Breitman and Jacob Kohn, who were both 4, were racing their bicycles, under the supervision of their mothers, Dana Breitman and Rachel Kohn, on the sidewalk of a building on East 52nd Street. At some point in the race, they struck an 87-year-old woman named Claire Menagh, who was walking in front of the building and, according to the complaint, was “seriously and severely injured,” suffering a hip fracture that required surgery. She died three months later.

Her estate sued the children and their mothers, claiming they had acted negligently during the accident. In a response, Juliet’s lawyer, James P. Tyrie, argued that the girl was not “engaged in an adult activity” at the time of the accident — “She was riding her bicycle with training wheels under the supervision of her mother” — and was too young to be held liable for negligence.

In legal papers, Mr. Tyrie added, “Courts have held that an infant under the age of 4 is conclusively presumed to be incapable of negligence.” (Rachel and Jacob Kohn did not seek to dismiss the case against them.)

But Justice Wooten declined to stretch that rule to children over 4. On Oct. 1, he rejected a motion to dismiss the case because of Juliet’s age, noting that she was three months shy of turning 5 when Ms. Menagh was struck, and thus old enough to be sued.

Mr. Tyrie “correctly notes that infants under the age of 4 are conclusively presumed incapable of negligence,” Justice Wooten wrote in his decision, referring to the 1928 case. “Juliet Breitman, however, was over the age of 4 at the time of the subject incident. For infants above the age of 4, there is no bright-line rule.”

The New York Law Journal reported the decision on Thursday.

Mr. Tyrie had also argued that Juliet should not be held liable because her mother was present; Justice Wooten disagreed.

“A parent’s presence alone does not give a reasonable child carte blanche to engage in risky behavior such as running across a street,” the judge wrote. He added that any “reasonably prudent child,” who presumably has been told to look both ways before crossing a street, should know that dashing out without looking is dangerous, with or without a parent there. The crucial factor is whether the parent encourages the risky behavior; if so, the child should not be held accountable.

In Ms. Menagh’s case, however, there was nothing to indicate that Juliet’s mother “had any active role in the alleged incident, only that the mother was ‘supervising,’ a term that is too vague to hold meaning here,” he wrote. He concluded that there was no evidence of Juliet’s “lack of intelligence or maturity” or anything to “indicate that another child of similar age and capacity under the circumstances could not have reasonably appreciated the danger of riding a bicycle into an elderly woman.”

Mr. Tyrie, Dana Breitman and Rachel Kohn did not respond to messages seeking comment.

Jaguar-C-X75 Concept Revealed

October 7, 2010

Computer network operations – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

October 6, 2010
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Computer Network Operations (CNO) is a broad term that has both military and civilian application. Conventional wisdom is that information is power, and more and more of the information necessary to make decisions is digitized and conveyed over an ever expanding network of computers and other electronic devices. CNO are the deliberate actions taken to leverage and optimize these networks to improve human endeavor and enterprise or, in warfare, to gain information superiority and deny the enemy this enabling capability.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] CNO in the Military Domain

Within the military domain, CNO is considered one of five core capabilities under Information Operations (IO) Information Warfare. The other capabilities include Psychological Operations (PSYOP), Military Deception (MILDEC), Operations Security (OPSEC) and Electronic Warfare (EW).

Computer Network Operations, in concert with EW, is used primarily to disrupt, disable, degrade or deceive an enemy’s command and control, thereby crippling the enemy’s ability to make effective and timely decisions, while simultaneously protecting and preserving friendly command and control.

[edit] Types of Military CNO

According to Joint Pub 3-13, CNO consists of computer network attack (CNA), computer network defense (CND) and computer network exploitation (CNE).

  • Computer Network Attack (CNA): Includes actions taken via computer networks to disrupt, deny, degrade, or destroy the information within computers and computer networks and/or the computers/networks themselves.
  • Computer Network Defense (CND): Includes actions taken via computer networks to protect, monitor, analyze, detect and respond to network attacks, intrusions, disruptions or other unauthorized actions that would compromise or cripple defense information systems and networks. Joint Pub 6.0 further outlines Computer Network Defense as an aspect of NetOps
  • Computer Network Exploitation (CNE): Includes enabling actions and intelligence collection via computer networks that exploit data gathered from target or enemy information systems or networks.

[edit] See also

[edit] References

[edit] External links

Hacker Spoofs Cell Phone Tower to Intercept Calls | Cyber, War and Law™

October 6, 2010

Hacker Spoofs Cell Phone Tower to Intercept Calls: “Via: Wired: A security researcher created a cell phone base station that tricks cell phones into routing their outbound calls through his device, allowing someone to intercept even encrypted calls in the clear. The device tricks the phones into disabling encryption and records call details and content before they’re routed on their proper way through […]”

NASA plans to fly a spacecraft directly into the sun – SmartPlanet

September 10, 2010

smartplanet.com / Smart Technology / Thinking Tech

NASA plans to fly a spacecraft directly into the sun

By Dan Nosowitz | Sep 8, 2010 | 30 Comments

Solar Probe Plus is a project that astronauts, scientists, meteorologists, and astronomers have been dreaming of for a half-century. It’s an extraordinary proposal, venturing eight times farther than any previous spacecraft. It will certainly cost more than one billion dollars, and requires engineering and technology that’s never been seen before.

All this for a one-way trip to the sun.

Solar Probe Plus is the name of a project in which an unmanned (obviously), lightweight probe will travel through the sun’s corona, which is essentially the sun’s outer atmosphere. It seeks to answer some of space’s most puzzling questions–why is the corona almost 200 times hotter than the sun’s actual surface? How does the sun create the solar wind, a stream of charged particles that engulfs the solar system in a vast bubble called the heliosphere?

These are basic questions about our own solar system that have so far been unanswerable due to budgetary and technical limitations–but not anymore.

One of the most obvious problems is the immense heat the probe must be able to withstand. That the probe must tolerate heat at 2,600 degrees Fahrenheit is bad enough, but NASA won’t even be able to use the same methods used for probes returning to Earth. In those probes, the outer heat shields “ablate,” or boil away harmlessly–but when the whole point is to carefully conduct particle detection and other measurement, you can’t have part of a dissolved shield mucking up the findings.

But NASA scientists are confident that they’ll be able to create a suitable probe by 2018, the prospective launch date. Solar Probe Plus will arrive at Venus eight weeks after liftoff, conduct 24 orbits of increasing size, and end up about four million miles from the sun–inside Mercury’s orbit, eight times closer to the sun than any previous mission.

Though much of the motivation for Solar Probe Plus is research, there actually are a few legitimate practical reasons to undertake such a mission. Says Discovery:

Solar storms and magnetic disturbances from the sun can disrupt satellites and radio transmission, as well as take out power grids on Earth.

“Right now, predicting space weather is kind of like trying to predict hurricanes without knowing the acceleration effects of the oceans. Without that, you really can’t understand them at all,” Dantzler said.

NASA is expected to make final decisions on the probe’s instruments and sensors this month.

64-bit rootkit spreading | bit

September 9, 2010

64-bit rootkit spreading

Published on 31st August 2010 by Gareth Halfacree

64-bit rootkit spreading

The latest build of the Alureon rootkit is able to infect 64-bit Windows builds – the first to do so.

A particularly virulent rootkit targeting Windows machines – known as Alureon – is back, and this time it comes in a 64-bit edition.

With more and more systems coming with 64-bit builds of Windows pre-installed in order to take advantage of 4GB – or more – of RAM, it was only a matter of time before crackers starting coding malware to accommodate the shifting target landscape – and it looks like that day is here.

According to Help Net Security this latest build of Alureon is the first rootkit in the wild with the ability to successfully infect and hide itself in 64-bit Windows builds.

Running the 64-bit version of Windows has traditionally offered some protection from rootkits and other malware packages, as the differing memory locations mean that a 32-bit rootkit attempting a buffer overflow exploit may find that it overwrites the wrong part of memory and fails to execute – or, in the best case scenario, fails to overflow at all. Sadly, it looks like that small measure of protection is rapidly vanishing.

Despite protections built into the latest versions of Windows – including Kernel Mode Code Signing, which prevents unsigned – and therefore unauthorised – code from accessing kernel memory and Kernel Patch Protection – the latest Alureon build continues to infect systems world-wide, by installing a modified Master Boot Record and immediately causing Windows to restart. When the MBR is loaded, the rootkit can load its kernel module without the protections kicking in.

It looks like the authors are still finding their feet in the world of 64-bit infections, however; PrevX researcher Marco Giuliani claims that the current version found in the wild appears to be a “beta build,” as its infection attempts “didn’t always fully work” in internal testing.

Are you surprised that it has taken the ne’er-do-wells this long to develop rootkits for 64-bit Windows, or just saddened that yet more of Microsoft’s well-meaning protection systems have been rendered useless? Share your thoughts over in the forums.

Previous Article

Share This News Story

25 Comments

Discuss in the forums Reply

fingerbob69 31st August 2010, 09:57 Quote

Thanks for the warning …but how do I best protect myself?

Gareth Halfacree 31st August 2010, 10:02 Quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by fingerbob69
Thanks for the warning …but how do I best protect myself?

Well, I moved to Linux – but I appreciate that’s not always an option. 😉

Best things to do:
1) Don’t download dodgy copies of software.
B) Keep your system up-to-date
iii) Run a decent anti-virus and anti-spyware scanner
IV) Refrain from clicking links that you know you shouldn’t

They don’t offer complete protection, but that should see you a lot safer than most.

leveller 31st August 2010, 10:06 Quote

Gareth, do all current antiV pick up root kits? Going back a couple of years there was only a downloadable detector from MS’s website.

Neoki 31st August 2010, 10:15 Quote

Leveller,

All decent AV/IS products will contain Anti-Rootkit modules.

Joey9801 31st August 2010, 12:08 Quote

Hurrah for opensuse 🙂

Unknownsock 31st August 2010, 12:29 Quote

The question being is, why do people write stuff like this?

No seriously, I’d love to meet the guy who killed my computer a while back..

mrbens 31st August 2010, 12:43 Quote

Quote:
of 4GB – or more – of RAM

What’s with all the hyphens (-) all over this news article?!

Hyphens are to join two words, commas are to break up sentences. 🙂

LooseNeutral 31st August 2010, 13:32 Quote

More bad news. I’ve had to wear out some ears and rear parts about viruses and the like to friends who just won’t, or perhaps can’t understand. Or, more often don’t care that they spread this crap around like a friggin plague! A lot of my Mac friends don’t get it either. “Hello, sure your machine is fine but your a CARRIER! What’s that… Windows won’t work anymore and you don’t know what to do? I can’t imagine WHY!” I wonder if this will take down a Mac running Boot Camp or the like? So, any idea where they found this wild thing roaming about and why the great protectors (Antivirus devs) haven’t raised the red flags yet? SShh! Not so loud 😦

borandi 31st August 2010, 13:57 Quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbens

Quote:
of 4GB – or more – of RAM

What’s with all the hyphens (-) all over this news article?!

Hyphens are to join two words, commas are to break up sentences. 🙂

They’re dashes. Dashes are used like commas but often to form a differential clause opposite in context or character to the first. In this case though, commas would be more appropriate 🙂

Gareth Halfacree 31st August 2010, 14:16 Quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbens
What’s with all the hyphens (-) all over this news article?! Hyphens are to join two words, commas are to break up sentences. 🙂

I know, I know, I should be using an Em-dash for asides – but the last time I tried that, it broke non-UTF-8 browsers. :p

bogie170 31st August 2010, 15:56 Quote

So whats the best Alureon Rootkit finder to see if you have been infected?

greigaitken 31st August 2010, 16:13 Quote

Microsoft totally missing a great cash cow here. New OS overy six months so once malware developed for it – just buy the new OS. They wont even have to worry about making pointless incapable secuirity anymore

RichCreedy 31st August 2010, 17:59 Quote

will you buy a new os every 6 months i dont think so

Bakes 31st August 2010, 18:11 Quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by greigaitken
Microsoft totally missing a great cash cow here. New OS overy six months so once malware developed for it – just buy the new OS. They wont even have to worry about making pointless incapable secuirity anymore

That’s a great idea! I mean, what with the having to rewrite the entirety of Windows every six months, I think you’re on to something here!

Seriously though, security is a journey, not a destination, and if Microsoft’s 64bit security principles have been useful in preventing rootkits since Vista (beta builds of Vista were available 4 years ago) that’s a massive success in my book. Think of all the computers that haven’t been rootkitted due to running 64bit Windows.

veato 31st August 2010, 20:45 Quote

Got it yesterday. Along with the other crap it brought down too! The other stuff went easily but this nasty bugger hung around. Even when every piece of AV I had couldnt find it anymore I was still getting stuff like URL redirtections. Had to perform a full format last night!

Boogle 31st August 2010, 21:33 Quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by LooseNeutral
More bad news. I’ve had to wear out some ears and rear parts about viruses and the like to friends who just won’t, or perhaps can’t understand. Or, more often don’t care that they spread this crap around like a friggin plague! A lot of my Mac friends don’t get it either. “Hello, sure your machine is fine but your a CARRIER! What’s that… Windows won’t work anymore and you don’t know what to do? I can’t imagine WHY!” I wonder if this will take down a Mac running Boot Camp or the like? So, any idea where they found this wild thing roaming about and why the great protectors (Antivirus devs) haven’t raised the red flags yet? SShh! Not so loud 😦

Aaaarghhh stop bringing back the memories! 😥

thehippoz 31st August 2010, 22:19 Quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unknownsock
The question being is, why do people write stuff like this?

No seriously, I’d love to meet the guy who killed my computer a while back..

he’d just root you again after you beat him up 😀

skybarge 31st August 2010, 22:49 Quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by thehippoz

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unknownsock
The question being is, why do people write stuff like this?

No seriously, I’d love to meet the guy who killed my computer a while back..

he’d just root you again after you beat him up 😀

Plus you’d get in trouble for beating up a 10 year old script kiddie most prob 🙂 or someone with advanced autism

Pookeyhead 31st August 2010, 22:54 Quote

If you need to check for this beasty being present….

Quote:
If you did not have proactive detection in place, you can (currently) manually check to see if the bootkit is installed. As a side effect of the bootkit, the Disk Management pane of the Computer Management console will fail to show the system drive altogether:

It will also fail to show up in the command line using diskpart:

Lifted from MS Malware Protection Centre.

Keyword there being CURRENTLY. As soon as this is known to the developers of this crap, then that will probably be “fixed”.

LooseNeutral 1st September 2010, 00:19 Quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pookeyhead
If you need to check for this beasty being present….

Lifted from MS Malware Protection Centre.

Keyword there being CURRENTLY. As soon as this is known to the developers of this crap, then that will probably be “fixed”.

Much Appreciated! Thanks;)

azrael- 1st September 2010, 06:53 Quote

Well, one way around this would be using GPT instead of MBR. The good thing: Windows 7 x64 supports (booting from) it. The bad thing: AFAIR you’d need a motherboard with (U)EFI support as well. The really bad thing: Once (U)EFI takes over from BIOS (if it’ll ever happen) it’s going to be soooo much easier to write even more nasty malware/root kits.

Taniniver 1st September 2010, 07:45 Quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by azrael-
Once (U)EFI takes over from BIOS (if it’ll ever happen)

I think we will start to see it more and more soon, since we are reaching the hard drive size limitation imposed by the BIOS – you can’t boot from a drive bigger than 2 TB (approx) without UEFI.

fingerbob69 1st September 2010, 10:36 Quote

I think we will start to see it more and more soon, since we are reaching the hard drive size limitation imposed by the BIOS – you can’t boot from a drive bigger than 2 TB (approx) without UEFI.

Surely the answer to that (assuming you want to perpetuate BIOS) is that all computers come with atleast to drives: a small boot drive with enough spare space to allow for service packs, security updates etc and a larger storage drive for everything else.

In fact why not sell windows pre loaded onto an ssd that you can then just swop out with each new os upgrade or of course if the os becomes fataly infected?

HourBeforeDawn 2nd September 2010, 18:32 Quote

the latest version of TDSKiller should take care of this if you get infected.

LooseNeutral 3rd September 2010, 04:14 Quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by HourBeforeDawn
the latest version of TDSKiller should take care of this if you get infected.

Again, Thanks fellas! I don’t suppose a system under warranty would cover this crap 😕 :(Sounds like a plus for the mfg’s 😡 Hmmm NAH, ‘nother crazy conspiracy theory!?

Discuss in the forums

Posted via email from lamont price (at) posterous.com

Hackers exploit new PDF zero-day bug, warns Adobe – Computerworld

September 9, 2010

Computerworld – Adobe today warned users that attacks have begun exploiting an unpatched bug in its popular Reader and Acrobat PDF viewing and creation software.

The company issued an advisory on short notice today, saying that it had learned of in-the-wild attacks only on Tuesday.

“A critical vulnerability exists in Adobe Reader 9.3.4 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX, and Adobe Acrobat 9.3.4 and earlier versions for Windows and Macintosh,” Adobe’s warning read. This vulnerability could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.

“Adobe is in the process of evaluating the schedule for an update to resolve this vulnerability,” the advisory added.

Other than to say that “at this point, [attacks] appear to be limited,” Adobe offered little information on the bug today.

But Mila Parkour, the independent security researcher who reported the bug to Adobe on Tuesday, had plenty in a post to her Contagio Malware Dump blog.

Parkour uncovered a malicious e-mail message with a rogue PDF attachment that urged recipients to open the document. “Want to improve your score? In these golf tips, David Leadbetter shows you some important principles,” the message read.

Leadbetter, a well-known golf coach and author on the game, operates more than two dozen golf academies in 13 countries, and claims the title of “master of the art of teaching the golf swing.”

Symantec pegged the threat with a score of 8.5 out of possible 10, while Danish vulnerability tracker Secunia rated the vulnerability as “Extremely critical,” its highest-possible threat level.

According to a Symantec, the bug is in Reader’s and Acrobat’s parsing of PDF files that contain malformed TIFF image files. Specifically, said the company in an alert to customers, “the issue occurs due to a heap-memory corruption issue in ‘cooltype.dll.'”

CoolType is an Adobe font-rendering technology, similar to Microsoft‘s ClearType.

Adobe did not spell out a timetable for patching the Reader/Acrobat zero-day vulnerability, nor did it offer users any ad hoc defensive measures they could employ until a fix is ready.

The next regularly-scheduled patch date for Reader and Acrobat is Oct. 13, but Adobe has been known to issue so-called “out-of-band” emergency updates when active attacks spike.

An Adobe spokeswoman hinted that the latter could easily occur. “With exploit code publicly available, [the current limited-only attack] could change,” she said, talking about the exploit that Parkour has posted online.

Parkour has not released the exploit publicly, however, but has password-protected the malicious PDF she discovered, and will release it only to people who e-mail her.

Symantec urged Reader and Acrobat users not to open PDFs from untrusted or unknown senders.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at Twitter

@gkeizer or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed Keizer RSS

. His e-mail address is gkeizer@ix.netcom.com.

Read more about Security in Computerworld’s Security Topic Center.

Affiliate Marketing? What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun. Ecclt. 1:9

September 8, 2010

Canada unveils new speed bump: optical illusion of a child | The Upshot Yahoo! News – Yahoo! News

September 8, 2010